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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 51 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Aug 21, 2009 5:00pm EDT
fiscal responsibility and addressing key economic challenges facing america's future. >> good evening. i'm martin savidge. >>> scottish officials were already under fire even before they made it official yesterday and allowed a convicted terrorist to fly home to libya to die. the outrage only deepened today after these pictures of libyans celebrating abdel baset al megrahi's release were broadcast around the world. al megrahi, of course, was convicted for the 1988 bombing of pan am 103 over lockerbie scotland. the terror attack killed 270 people. and today, once again, many people were demanding to know just why had he been set free. this matter of justice is once again our "lead focus" tonight. >> reporter: abdel baset al megrahi should not be welcomed back to tripoli, that was the message, the warning to libya from president obama in america. the demand responsible for the deaths of 270 people, the biggest terrorist attack in britain was treated more like a celebrity or royalty changed into a dark suit, he was met off of the plane and then repeatedly hugged by colonel gadhafis own son
PBS
Aug 19, 2009 5:00pm EDT
hundreds. what's happening to the security america has spent and sacrificed to bring about? >>> how to measure success in america's other war in afghanistan. ares its first progress report. >>> we'll take you airborne to look at an extraordinary effort by the u.s. military to save lives in the middle of the war, welcome aboard an air ambulance. >>> and germany wants a million electric vehicles on the road by 2020. we'll plug you in on how they plan to do it. >>> from the world's leading reporters and analysts, here's what's happening from around the world. this is "worldfocus." made possible, in part, by the following funders -- major support has also been provided by the peter g. peterson foundation dedicated to promoting fiscal responsibility and addressing key economic challenges facing america's future. >> good evening, i'm martin savidge. >>> if you woke up this morning and turned on the news you might have felt a sense of discouragement about what you were hearing out of afghanistan and iraq. more than 5,000 american troops have died in those two countries since troops were de
PBS
Aug 26, 2009 5:00pm EDT
to promoting fiscal responsibility and addressing key economic challenges facing america's future. >>> good evening. i'm martin savidge. >>> the quest for peace in the middle east has been going on for generations now, and it never seems to get much easier. we got that impression again today after another apparently inconclusive meeting in london between israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu and u.s. middle east envoy george mitchell. the two men and the two nations they represent have been searching for months now for a way to resolve their differences over israeli settlements in the west bank. the u.s. has been pushing hard for an israeli settlement freeze, d the palestinians are refusing to restart peace talks until israel halts all construction there. despite their failure to reach agreement again today, the two sides will resume talks in washington next week. both men tried to put the best face on today's talks. >> we've made some headway in the past five months. my government has taken several steps both of word and deed towards peace. and i hope that today and in the coming weeks
WETA
Aug 19, 2009 5:30pm EDT
. what's happening to the security america has spent and sacrifice to bringabout? >>> how to measure success in america's other warn afanistan. ares its first progress report. >>> we'll take you airborne to look a an extraordinary effort by the u.s. military to save lives in t middle of the war, welcome aboard anir amlance. >>> d germanyants a million ectric vehiclesn the road by 2020. we'll plug you in on how they plan to do it. >>> fromhe world's leading reporters and analyst here's what's happeni from around the rld. this is "worfocus." made possible, in pa, by th following funder-- major support ha also been provided bthe peter g. peterson foundatio dedicated to promoting fiscal responsibity dddressing key economic allenges facing america's future. >> gd evening, i'm martin savidge. >>> if youoke up this mning and turnedn the news you might have felt a sense of discouragement aut what you were hring outf afghanistan and iraq. more tha5,000 american trps have die in those two countries nce troops were ployed to afghanistan in the fall of 2001 and iraq in e spring of 2003. and hune
PBS
Aug 27, 2009 5:00pm EDT
mexico and central america focuses on immigration issues. but tonight we want to explore another story emerging in that part of the world, the decriminalization of drugs. last week the mexican government announced that it will no longer jail users of small amounts of marijuana, cocaine and heroin. and other countries in that region have taken sim steps. what's it all about, for more we are joined tonight from washington by john walsh. he is a senior associate on drug policy for the washington office on latin america, which describes itself as a think tank advocacy group promoting human rights and democracy in latin america. welcome to the program. first, tell us more about what these new laws in mexico are. >> well, essentially they decriminalize possession for personal consumption across a range of elicit substances, whether it's marijuana or cocaine, and the mexican law, while new for mexico, is not necessarily new f latin america. there are similar decriminalization statutes up and down the continent, and it's a growing movement with recent argentine court decisions opening doort th
PBS
Aug 12, 2009 5:00pm EDT
the glaciers go? >>> and mexico's on going against drug cartels was a topic at this weeks north america summit. tonight our "signature story" focuses on one of the painful side effect of that fight. the disappeared. >>> from the world's leading reporters and analysts, here's what's happening from around the world. this is "worldfocus." made possible in part by the following funders -- >>> good evening. i'm martin savidge. >>> united states marines went on the offensive today. launching a major new attack on a taliban stronghold in the south of that country. hundreds of marines along with afghan troops went into battle under the cover of darkness to take back control of the town of dahaneh in helmand province a key base for taliban fighters. the marine offensive against the taliban, what it means and whether it's likely to succeed. is our "lead focus" tonight. some 500 marines and afghan army troops gather before dawn in preparation for the assault on dahaneh. many of the marines were dropped behind taliban lines in a commando-style raid. in pictures taken by journalists from the associated pre
PBS
Aug 17, 2009 5:00pm EDT
.m. e to one of america's most besieged outposted. the pilots won't land in this valley except on the darkest of nights when they're escorted by gunships. the taliban often lie and wait in the darkness of this remote valley. the gunships fire a missile into the hillside, a warning shot. outpost is the further reach of america power surrounded by mountains here in the pakistani border. a landing so the pilots worried that their razor blades could clip the hillside. this is the only way in or out of a tiny piece of land. america feels it has to hold on to but isn't sure why. and while the world's only superpower has found itself trapped. the hills all around offer beauty and also constant deadly attacks. >> we're surrounded in a bowl. so we're constantly -- >> reporter: captain porter leads a few dozen men pinned down among the sandbags. they don't have much contact with the locals apart from when they shoot at their base. >> over 35 contacts with the enemy since we've been here just under three months. so keeping us on our toes. >> reporter: why? >> my boss told me to come here.
PBS
Aug 31, 2009 5:00pm EDT
challenges facing america's future. >>> good evening. i'm daljit dhaliwal. he may not exactly be the barack obama of japan, but the man expected to become the country's next prime minister is talking about shaking things up in a way that japan has rarely seen. hatoyami will bring more liberal politics and government after his party swept to power in yesterday's parliamentary elections. and the way that japan does business with the united states and other powers is also going to change. because japan is one of america's most important allies, we will talk about all of this in depth tonight. but first, we want to show you how it played out and the way it looked on television. japan's version of election night from abc in australia. >> the democratic party of japan charged to victory. in a seismic shift in japanese politics, the center left opposition has broken the conservative stranglehold on power ending decades of virtual one-party rule. >> translator: the people are very angry with the conservative ruling party. i thank the people who supported us. we now need to fight and work hard. >> h
PBS
Aug 14, 2009 5:00pm EDT
from the criticisms of america's right. >>> from australia, a story on another issue that has raised passions here -- the right to die. in perth, a quadriplegic man has asked a judge to let him kill himself. tonight we have the ruling. >>> the president of taiwan raises the death toll from typhoon morakot to more than 500, amidst mounting criticism his government has been slow to help survivors. >>> and one night in bangkok is not just a hit song from the '80s. it could also describe how long it takes to go from one side of the city to the other. tonight, a report from bangkok's notorious traffic. buckle up. >>> from the world's leading reporters and analysts, here is what's happening from around the world. this is "worldfocus." made possible in part by the following funders -- >>> good evening, i'm martin savidge. >>> for weeks now, it's been topic number one in the united states. the president's ambitious plan to reform the health care system. there is probably no more controversial part of that plan than the so-called public option. supporters say it will help drive down prices by
PBS
Aug 24, 2009 5:00pm EDT
foundation dedicated to promoting fiscal responsibility and addressing key economic challenges facing america's future. good evening, i'm martin savidge. >>> the war in afghanistan. and tonight we want to take a deeper look at that conflict there from several perspectives you might not have seen, even though president obama has ordered 21,000 additional troops to afghanistan, america's military commanders are now saying that may not be enough to fight effectively against the taliban. yesterday, the chairman of the joint chiefs said the situation is serious. and it is deteriorating. that assessment came just days after afghanistan's presidential election, which continues to generate widespread allegations of fraud and intimidation as votes are counted. for americans, voting freely and without pressure is all but taken for granted, that is not the case if afghanistan. and to help you understand that, in tonight's "lead focus" we want to give you a firstland look what the some afghans faced just for voting in a remarkable piece of reporting of james base of al jazeera english. >> reporter: the t
WETA
Aug 27, 2009 5:30pm EDT
and central america focuses on immigrion issues. but tonight we want to explore another ory emerging i that rt of the world, the decriminalization ofrugs. last weekhe mexican goverent annoced that it will no longe jail users of smallmounts of marijua, cocaine and heroin. d other countries in that region have ten sim steps. what's it all about, for mre we are joined tonight from washington by john lsh. is a senior associate on drug poli for the washington oice on latin america which describes itself as ahink tank adcacy group promoting human rights anddemocracy in latin america. welcome to t program. first, tell us moreabout what these new laws in xico are. >> well, eentially they decriminizepossession for personalonsumption across a range of ecit substances, whether it'smarijuana or cocaine,nd th mexicanaw, while new for mexico, is not necearily new f latin america. there are similar decriminalizatn statutes up and down th continent, a it's a growing movement with recent argentine court decisions opening doorthe door to a simil reform in that untry. >> what'behind the decision to decriminalize
WETA
Aug 24, 2009 5:30pm EDT
and addressing keyconomic challees facing america's future. od eveni, i'm martin sadge. >>> the wain afghanistan. d tonight we want to ta a deeper look at thatonflict there from several rspectives you might not havseen, even though president obama has ordered 21,000 aitional troops to afghanist, america's military commanders are now ying that may not be enough to fight eectively against the taliba sterday, the cirman of the joint chiefs sa the situation is serious. and it deterrating. that assessment came st days ter afghastan's presidential election, whic continues to generate widespread allegations of fraud and intimidation as votes are counted for americans, voting freely and without pressures all but taken for granted, that is not the case if afghanisn. and toelp you unrstand tht, in tonight's "lead fos" we want to gi you a firstland look what e someafghans faced just for voting in remarkable piece of reporting of james ba al jazeera englis >> reporter: t taliban said th'd find the people who defied their ords and took part in the election. they are livinup to their word these ctures showe
WETA
Aug 20, 2009 5:30pm EDT
internationalournalists are using the occason to take a look at the conditions in that country. just what has america's ally, had karzai, accomished during his five years in office? it's a matt of considerable interest in germany, whichas 4,000 troops in afghanistan. is karz doing a good job? not according to this story by germanese deutsche velia it's a how they see it report. >> reporter: many afghans ar unhappy with histyle of governme. he's been criticized for hnding official positions to powerful warlds. the organizaon transparcy internationasays afghanistan is one of the most crupt countries the world. translator: the governmentin kabul is only interested in its own survival, as long as it reins rife with corrupon and nepotism instead of concentrating on deliveringood leadership, it will only beble to survive wh military help from weste cotries. >> reporr: efforts to build e country have made sme progress, t more slowlyhan many had hoped. afghanistan has received billionsf euros in aid, including $550 million fr germany. but half of afghan sils still l below the poverty line. >> translator: gi
PBS
Aug 8, 2009 12:00am EDT
will become born. we have become slaves of america. if we do not change our thinking lots of baitullahs will keep being born. >> for more on this story we are joined by lisa curtis, she's a senior research fellow at the heritage foundation and she joins us from washington. nice to have you back. >> thanks for having me again. >> what do you think the impact will be on the taliban in pakistan? will they recover from this, and if so, how long will it take them? >> well, i think this is a significant victory for pakistan, its fight against terrorism specially coming on the heels of the pakistan military's ability to oust the taliban from the swat valley region. but we know that military commanders can be replaced. so this doesn't mean the end of the pakistani taliban, yet it is a very significant development. and it could also change the debate about drone strikes in pakistan. pakistani officials have been very critical of these drone strikes but i think it would be hard for them to argue that this is an important tool in the fight against terrorists that threaten pakistan itself. >> that'
WETA
Aug 12, 2009 5:30pm EDT
is a nior fellow at the new america foundation in shington, d.c. thanks f being with us. >> thank you for hing me. we've heard a lot tonight about w official corruptions impeding therug war in mexico and m wondering that why the mexican governme deployed tens of ousands of troops to fight drug cartels, and thens it working? >> it's one of the reans why there was a perceive depl the military, yes. the fact that a lot local police fces had been compromised and infiltrated which is recurring problem in mexico. i wouldn'tay it's only from corruption though. i think it's actlly a matter -- there was no other force t throw at the proem. mexico lacks a song muscular ti police force. so paly that the government was being outgunn. >> is it worki? >> there's a stalemate in place. it worked initially. a sort of shock-and-e element to having the army patrol the streets. buover time the cartels have adjusted to thnew reaty. and if you take say, srez in mexico lt month it was t deadlit month sincehe mexican revoluti in that city. so it'snot seen as a viable longterm strategy, no. >> the united sta
WETA
Aug 28, 2009 5:30pm EDT
facing america' futu. >>> good eveni. i'm martinavidge. >>> we are going to start tonight th afghanistan, where the death of a u.s. soldier today made this the deadliest month of the eighyear war for american forces. 45 u. troops have been killed so far in gust. itis withhat ackdrop, the escalatingar and its increasing toll that the wa for the results of last week presidential election ha turned increasilytense. we've learned on the dramatic example of that. a fiery meeting in ich the special envoy to th region chard holbrooke, raised concernsbout alleged election fraud th president hami karzai. kenny of itn puts it in context for s tonight's "lead focus." >> rorter: a president fast losing international support, a suspec and bloody ection, and one ve angry u.s. envoy -- the scene for a fiery meeti where richard holbrooke reportedly took hamid karzai to task and suggested a runf would help legitimize afghanistan's democratic process. the coalion is in a bind. foreign troops enable the first afgh-run elections in30 ars. but at the co of many lives. yet, there's no secretthere are deep res
WHUT
Aug 24, 2009 10:30pm EDT
cadets. eporter: he says that military commitment is, in part, repayment for america's support when estonia broke free from 50 years of soviet rule. an event the country's prime minister andrus ansip calls a miracle. >> when estonia occupied and then not so many countries supported free republic of estonia at that time. but the united states of america and some other countries, they never recognized the illegal cooperation of the free baltic states of the soviet union. >> reporter: estonians also see a connection between their long history of occupation and other nae of freedom. you can see the evidence of the people determined to hold onto an independent identity all around the capital city of tallinn. the wall that surrounds the ancient city of tallinn is a reminder of just how hard this country has struggled against invasions. in the last century alone, both germany and the soviet union have occupied estonia. >> all the people know that freedom is not free. we got huge help when the help was need for estonia and this our moral duty to help others. >> rep
PBS
Aug 7, 2009 5:00pm EDT
priest of -- may have been celebrated of such across america, but since they announced record profits and record bonus -- they'd been under attack as never before from some pretty unlikely quarters. >> i don't think in the history of the united states there has been a company with as much direct influence on public policy as goldman sachs since the days of maybe jpmorgan or standard oil. >> reporter: for its critics, goldman's success is due to it being plugged directly into washington's -- power. there can be no doubt that goldman sachs alumni are incredibly well placed in all tions of political influence, democrats or republican. take the past four chairman, robert ruben, the secretary who deregulated complex financial markets. jon corzine, close to president obama. stephen friedman. bush chief economic adviser until may, chief regulator of goldman while sitting on its board and buying millions of dollars of shares and then hank paulson. president bush's treasure secretary responsible for the controversial bailouts. >> goldman has an extraordinary record of former employees joining
WETA
Aug 5, 2009 5:30pm EDT
an emotion homecoming, we ask, what did america have to give to get them ack, and why is south korea conceed? >>> in iran, a police confront protesters shoutindeath to the dictator,mahmoud ahmadinej sworin as edent, nearly two months ater his disputed electiontriggered massive unrest. >>> while most of the worlhas moved on from the storf the battle by pakisti troop to oust the taliban fr the swat valley, we check i o the humanitarianrisis it trigged and find it fafrom over. >>> and in a reminder of the people powe she inspired more than two decades ago. te of thoundings of filinos turn now the manila to bid former president corzano keeno farell. >>> ld's leading reporters and analysts, re is what's hapning from around the world. this is "wldfocus." made possible, ipart, by the foowing funders -- >>good evening, i'm martin savidge. >>> ty had been detained for five months and ced 12 yars in north korean pson camp. buthis morning american journalist laura ling and euna lee we finally backon amican soil. freed after a surised visit to north koreay former presint bill clinton. as ling put it, th
WETA
Aug 6, 2009 5:30pm EDT
pledges to expand america's suppo for somalia's weak interim government. > americans may be busy trading their clunkers for new cars. in theest african nation of benin,e show you the booming business tt brings new lifeto d automobiles. >>spy in the sky. israel launches new kindf surveillance play th can go from backpacto front lines in just minutes. >>> and py poor latvi crusd by the econom doturn, it's snoufring a new problem, british bhelors gone wild >>> good eveningi'm martin savid savidge. it's been quite a ek for clinton mily, with bill clinton capturing headlinesn north korea thlast two days. today it was hillary clion in africa. e secretary of state was talking tough about islamic extremists in somia and offering toxpand and extend american support to that very tenuous government in that country. sh said the militant there see somalias a futureaven for glob terrorism. in tonight's lead focus,we look at clinton visit to africa and its goa. on t second full d of her african our, secretary of ste hillarclinton was in nairobi, nya. there she honored the victi of th 98 bombings of the
WETA
Aug 7, 2009 5:30pm EDT
america have to give to get these journalists back. >> didn'have a lot to give. they certainly gave concessions, if you wi, when you think of the fact that kim jong-il s got a big propaganda hit out of this. there waquestion about his health. he's now provedo the world at he's alive. that's something. >> and that was a bi question. >> and that was a big queson. he got big propanda boost in his own country. the frontage ofhe north korean pap had five pictures ofim jong-il with bi clinton. it wast uil you got to pa three tha you had a littl blurb at mentioned that the journalists had be freed. and finally, you've got -- you've got show the world that youtill had some control over yourountry over which there was some significant doubts >> well, whose crt is the bal in now to try to moveit forward? stereo we, what's interesting also -- and nikhil was right. it also showed t world that north rea is rational to a certain degree. it could sit down andtalk it a western leader of some state and come out of it looking not like complete crazi in that respect. so i guess in thatrespect, you kn
WETA
Aug 25, 2009 5:30pm EDT
to promoting fiscal responsility and addressing key economi challees facing america's future. >> good eving. i'm mart savidge. >>> five days aer scotland released the man convicted of mbing a panjetliner over lockerbie, scotld killing 270 people, the controversynd the outrage over helease a his welcome home in bya continu today. the is, as you can imagine, a great de of analys and dissecon of the decision going on i theritish pres. scotland is, after all, a pt of the uned kingdo was there a deal for the terrorist release where, we british oil intests in libya a fact? the fascinatinquestions that e not getting much attenti in this couny and thate will focus on in amoment. but first, british prime mister gordon brown, he spoke out for t first time today abt abdelbaset al. megrahi and s hoecoming. >> myhoughts are with the oughtings of the victims. and i was both angry d i was repulsed by the eception that a convicd bomber guilty of a huge terrorist cme turned a return to libya. and that brings tous tonights "lead foc." our britishpartner, itn's been looking britain's relatiship with libbia, it
PBS
Aug 25, 2009 5:00pm EDT
challenges facing america's future. >> good evening. i'm martin savidge. >>> five days after scotland released the man convicted of mbing a panamjetliner over lockerbie, scotland killing 270 people, the controversy and the outrage over his release and his welcome home in libya continued today. there is, as you can imagine, a great deal of analysis and dissection of the decision going on in the british press. scotland is, after all, a part of the united kingdom. was there a deal for the terrorist release where, were british oil interests in libya a factor? the fascinating questions that are not getting much attention in this country and that we will focus on in a moment. but first, british prime minister gordon brown, he spoke out for the first time today about abdelbaset al. megrahi and his homecoming. >> my thoughts are with the thoughtings of the victims. and i was both angry and i was repulsed by the reception that a convicted bomber guilty of a huge terrorist crime returned a return to libya. >> and that brings to us tonights "lead focus." our british partner, itn's been looking a
WETA
Aug 10, 2009 5:30pm EDT
america summit bringi together prime minister harper of canada, president obama off t united states and calderon of mexico. soart of thisarger rmat. >> i was looking a flu season just around theorner and i understa talking about wife is on the, the agenda here and it sa that there will be greater coeration p i'm just wondering, wh exactly is do that an. >> unprecedented cooperation when swine flu bke now the april. weaw scientists from canada, theunited states, get together, scientis from mexico too to actually figur out what swine flu was and then to try to corol it. so we'llee that continue and may also see the movement o vaccines ofther types of treatments ithe fall season when sbf, when everyone thinks it will return. >> so we see good cooeration on swe flu. trade,hough has been a contentiousssue and i'm wondering what a the problems the and how are we doing in solving them? >> you then is a contentious issue. we obviously ha very close ties with bothf ourneighbors. they're both the first and the large laest trading partne for the unit states. they both worry about bio amican cl
PBS
Aug 10, 2009 5:00pm EDT
's been held annually for the last four years. it's a north america summit bringing together prime minister harper of canada, president obama offed the united states and calderon of mexico. so part of this larger format. >> i was looking at flu season just around the corner and i understand talking about wife is on the, the agenda here and it's said that there will be greater cooperation p i'm just wondering, what exactly is does that mean. >> unprecedented cooperation when swine flu broke now the april. we saw scientists from canada, the united states, get together, scientists from mexico too to actually figure out what swine flu was and then to try to control it. so we'll see that continue and we may also see the movement of vaccines of other types of treatments in the fall season when sbf, when everyone thinks it will return. >> so we see good cooperation on swine flu. trade, though has been a contentious issue and i'm wondering what are the problems there and how are we doing in solving them? >> you then is a contentious issue. we obviously have very close ties with both of our
PBS
Aug 13, 2009 5:00pm EDT
of the infectious disease society of america and is the chair of the department of medicine at new york university school of medicine. as we just heard, the swine flu is spreading quite rapidly around the world. but the global death count, which right now i believe is at 1,500, remains relatively low. so just how dangerous is disease? >> i think as you point, it's spreading all over the world. it's been present in more than 150 countries. i would guess there already have been tens of millions of cases of infection. and terelatively small number o deaths. but for most of the world lives, it's the summertime and this outbreak isn't over. in fact, it's just beginning. >> but i want to keep in perspective the regular flu, that's what we're going to call it. how many people die? >> in the u.s. it's estimated about 35,000 people a year. >> how many people have died from the swine flu so far? >> so far about 400. >> the concern seems to be that's often talked about is this flu, swine flu, could mutate into a deadlier form. how likely is that? >> so far the fact that it's been in millions of people and ha
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 51 (some duplicates have been removed)